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  I’ve been asked a lot: Why Burma? My response is, I don’t know.    My decision on what places to visit, or why, are based on the simple interest of exploring the unknown, the uncanny, personal desires, and basically just having the chance of going to places that I know very little about them.  Visiting the golden land and get lost, with no plans other than simply let encounters and experiences guide me through this country, is my plan.  After 24 hours, I arrive in Yangon. The smells, the dust, and the extreme hot and humid conditions are some of the things that I wont forget very easily. The only way I communicate with people is sign language and when I’m lucky in a very broken english. Suddenly I realize that people is more interested in me than I am of them. They take my photos as I take theirs. Curiosity is mutual. Not many westerners come here and much less interact with the people, or so I’m told by a local.  Burmese people are some of the friendliest people I’ve met in my life. Curious, always with a smile wanting to share their food or tea or inviting me into their houses.  Everywhere I go, the light is special, and something I have not seen before, long shadows that I follow in the narrow streets, surrounded by old buildings from the English and Portuguese days, I can still see the inscriptions on the walls. Crowded and chaotic streets with food smells, vast landscapes and one way rural roads, makes me think of Burma as a place stucked in time.  I walk more than 13 hours a day, relentlessly, meeting people on every corner, I move by bus, train, boat, cow or anything that takes me across the country. No connection with the world at all, Burma is a place that takes me out of my comfort zone. In every sense. And I love that, just me, my cameras, my notebook and a bag.  Every person that I meet, shares their life story with me, and how to face life from a different point of view. One that I now treasure and feel honored to have experienced. 

I’ve been asked a lot: Why Burma? My response is, I don’t know. 

My decision on what places to visit, or why, are based on the simple interest of exploring the unknown, the uncanny, personal desires, and basically just having the chance of going to places that I know very little about them. 
Visiting the golden land and get lost, with no plans other than simply let encounters and experiences guide me through this country, is my plan.

After 24 hours, I arrive in Yangon. The smells, the dust, and the extreme hot and humid conditions are some of the things that I wont forget very easily. The only way I communicate with people is sign language and when I’m lucky in a very broken english.
Suddenly I realize that people is more interested in me than I am of them. They take my photos as I take theirs. Curiosity is mutual. Not many westerners come here and much less interact with the people, or so I’m told by a local. 
Burmese people are some of the friendliest people I’ve met in my life. Curious, always with a smile wanting to share their food or tea or inviting me into their houses.

Everywhere I go, the light is special, and something I have not seen before, long shadows that I follow in the narrow streets, surrounded by old buildings from the English and Portuguese days, I can still see the inscriptions on the walls. Crowded and chaotic streets with food smells, vast landscapes and one way rural roads, makes me think of Burma as a place stucked in time.

I walk more than 13 hours a day, relentlessly, meeting people on every corner, I move by bus, train, boat, cow or anything that takes me across the country. No connection with the world at all, Burma is a place that takes me out of my comfort zone. In every sense. And I love that, just me, my cameras, my notebook and a bag. 
Every person that I meet, shares their life story with me, and how to face life from a different point of view. One that I now treasure and feel honored to have experienced. 

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I’ve been asked a lot: Why Burma? My response is, I don’t know. 

My decision on what places to visit, or why, are based on the simple interest of exploring the unknown, the uncanny, personal desires, and basically just having the chance of going to places that I know very little about them. 
Visiting the golden land and get lost, with no plans other than simply let encounters and experiences guide me through this country, is my plan.

After 24 hours, I arrive in Yangon. The smells, the dust, and the extreme hot and humid conditions are some of the things that I wont forget very easily. The only way I communicate with people is sign language and when I’m lucky in a very broken english.
Suddenly I realize that people is more interested in me than I am of them. They take my photos as I take theirs. Curiosity is mutual. Not many westerners come here and much less interact with the people, or so I’m told by a local. 
Burmese people are some of the friendliest people I’ve met in my life. Curious, always with a smile wanting to share their food or tea or inviting me into their houses.

Everywhere I go, the light is special, and something I have not seen before, long shadows that I follow in the narrow streets, surrounded by old buildings from the English and Portuguese days, I can still see the inscriptions on the walls. Crowded and chaotic streets with food smells, vast landscapes and one way rural roads, makes me think of Burma as a place stucked in time.

I walk more than 13 hours a day, relentlessly, meeting people on every corner, I move by bus, train, boat, cow or anything that takes me across the country. No connection with the world at all, Burma is a place that takes me out of my comfort zone. In every sense. And I love that, just me, my cameras, my notebook and a bag. 
Every person that I meet, shares their life story with me, and how to face life from a different point of view. One that I now treasure and feel honored to have experienced. 

  I’ve been asked a lot: Why Burma? My response is, I don’t know.    My decision on what places to visit, or why, are based on the simple interest of exploring the unknown, the uncanny, personal desires, and basically just having the chance of going to places that I know very little about them.  Visiting the golden land and get lost, with no plans other than simply let encounters and experiences guide me through this country, is my plan.  After 24 hours, I arrive in Yangon. The smells, the dust, and the extreme hot and humid conditions are some of the things that I wont forget very easily. The only way I communicate with people is sign language and when I’m lucky in a very broken english. Suddenly I realize that people is more interested in me than I am of them. They take my photos as I take theirs. Curiosity is mutual. Not many westerners come here and much less interact with the people, or so I’m told by a local.  Burmese people are some of the friendliest people I’ve met in my life. Curious, always with a smile wanting to share their food or tea or inviting me into their houses.  Everywhere I go, the light is special, and something I have not seen before, long shadows that I follow in the narrow streets, surrounded by old buildings from the English and Portuguese days, I can still see the inscriptions on the walls. Crowded and chaotic streets with food smells, vast landscapes and one way rural roads, makes me think of Burma as a place stucked in time.  I walk more than 13 hours a day, relentlessly, meeting people on every corner, I move by bus, train, boat, cow or anything that takes me across the country. No connection with the world at all, Burma is a place that takes me out of my comfort zone. In every sense. And I love that, just me, my cameras, my notebook and a bag.  Every person that I meet, shares their life story with me, and how to face life from a different point of view. One that I now treasure and feel honored to have experienced. 
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_DSC9463.jpg
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_DSC9485.jpg
_R025466.jpg
_DSC8076.jpg
_DSC8091.jpg
_DSC8597.jpg
_R025532.jpg
_DSC8141.jpg
_DSC8759.jpg
_DSC8256.jpg
_DSC8275.jpg
_DSC8318.jpg
_DSC8370.jpg
_DSC8341.jpg
_DSC8746.jpg
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_R025916.jpg
_R025908.jpg
_DSC8619.jpg
_DSC9192.jpg
_DSC8465.jpg
_DSC9216.jpg
_DSC9199.jpg
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